Found in the Field · Ideas of Curiosity · Relational Aesthetics

物の哀れ

Mono no aware (物の哀れ, もののあはれ[1]), literally “the pathos of things”, and also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera“, is a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence (無常, mujō), or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life.[2] [wikipedia]


Been talking. Been quieting. Been sharing, but only very selectively. Rekindling with a handful, and learning that sometimes the best thing to do is… start again.

Ergo, I’ve been mulling.

The next things are next.



Above is a piece of work by Matt Shlian. I found ‘Swire’ while perusing this article. In which Shlian shares personal thoughts about what makes a piece of art great: ‘A piece of art needs to connect. It needs to have some element of truth to it that resonates with the viewer and leaves them something after they’ve left the piece.


‘A good piece asks questions,’ he says, ‘and teaches you something you didn’t know or shows you something you didn’t know you knew. It articulates something we’ve felt, and we connect to that thing in a way where words aren’t necessary. It’s a feeling that’s hard to describe but makes us feel less alone in a way—that someone else understands us and gives a voice to this thing inside us. ‘A piece of art extends beyond its frame and becomes part of us…’


Source: https://mymodernmet.com/what-is-great-art/

And you? What are you making lately? What about just-for-today?

Cool.

Discover and connect with us, if you’re curious about how it all works, to get conversations going in a way that illuminates… us… to each other, and ourselves. Our reflection-oriented conversions happen through Kismuth, with the 2014-2020 program called The Cojournal Project, and more design- and philosophy and other thinky thinky goes on while we co-create in S P A C E. Together.


Instagramming…

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