Music x Design

In the 2000s DK got to go to a lot of gigs since we were based at that time in Seattle. One of my favorite venues was the Baltic Room.

In the 2010s thanks to TH, an architect, DK got to rebrand that nightclub.

‘Design is making meaning’

Cool to see that they are still using our design…. 

T., after all, had referred us. She had been one of our first clients. A combination of: a shared aesthetic appreciation of the beauty of chance encounters, plus a common love of jazz (which is after all improvisation in space on the spot), was what led to us meeting T in the first place. ‘I’ve been looking for you,’ T had said. ‘To do the design for my new company. When I break out to do my own company, you’re my designers: I just know.’

And that’s how a thing starts, sometimes.

The Baltic Room rebrand was cool. Was fun to be a part of the process of seeing things update, and guiding the identity redesign by the usual process of ours. We just ask a lot of questions, at the start. It’s like 90% of the whole design project is happening at he start. You have to have that thrashing period so everyone can get the point where they can be honest and say what they really want to say instead of trying to please someone else at the table. Somewhere along the way there’s a harmony that you can find… I guess design is like music in that regard, too… it just comes into shape on the spot when the mood is right and the people are in the spirit of being ‘on,’ intellectually and creatively, to do the jam, together.

I want to give people a chance to think clearly and long-term, so they don’t have to redo everything later.

Thought of it for two reasons this week.

  • One: I’m working on a few more issues of S P A C E to round out our Autumn 2019 collection, which includes stuff from the Baltic States visit , and
  • Two: I always liked electronica but I kind of can’t get over this:

Despite myself, I like it.

S P A C E investigates ‘Honeymoon’ selfie

From the organizers:

The exhibition, with the contribution of the creative agency and printed magazine Honeymoon High, will be focused on the self-image in the post-internet age, attempting to define online and offline conditions.

The title of the exhibition has been based on the idea expressed by American curator and one of the magazine Art in America editors Brian Droitcour. In his essay The Perils of Post-Internet ArtDroitcour writes that the relationship between art and the “post-internet” age can be compared to the relationship between pornography and sex: “Post-Internet art does to art what porn does to sex—renders it lurid.” The right angles, effusive facial expressions and postures, bodies balancing on the border of body perfection and deviation – all this is needed for us to believe in each aestheticized orgasm. Likewise, the art, too, lives in images – in perfect white-box contrast and saturation of colours.

Participants: Honeymoon High

Curator: Elīna Sproģe

Opening 17 May 7pm

Daily 3-7pm on Avotu 46
Admission free